We will be starting our revegetation project this Saturday October 29th at 9am. We will be meeting at pabco road at the 2nd road crossing. 

On this day we will be putting in the required fence and pulling weeds. If you are able to join us this weekend please bring if possible gloves, rakes, and shovels. Please wear a long sleeve shirt as well due to the large tumble weeds that will be needed for removal. 

If you have any questions regarding the revegetation please dont hesitate to ask. 

 

DAY ONE: 

SATURDAY OCTOBER 28th - 9am  Tumble Weed pulling and installing fence. As much help as possible will be needed in order to get done in a timely manner.

Location: Pabco Road 2nd  road crossing meet up, overflow parking will be at S/F off of Pabco road since we need to carpool into the area as much as possible.Items needed: Gloves and long sleeve shirts will be needed since weeds need to be pulled out by root not dug out.

DAY TWO:

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 5th  Reseeding, this will be done with a small group of individuals, as this will not require as many hands to operate the machine being used.

DAY THREE:

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 12th - Planting at  9am This day will require as much help as possible due to the high volume of plants being planted.

Location: will be Pabco road S/F area for parking and we will car pool in to reveg area.tems Needed: will be gloves and shovels for planting.

 

Thank you.
Brittany Burgos 702-325-9623

 

 

There has been a lot of concern regarding the lawsuit that was recently filed. This suit was filed prematurely and was a result due to the recent issues involving SNORE’s sale of the Mint 400 name.  The SNORE Boards of Directors and several current Members were concerned that the sale of the Mint 400 was unfair and not in SNORE’s best interest. The purpose of the lawsuit was to momentarily stop the sale and allow it to go before the entire SNORE membership for a vote on whether to continue forward with the sale.  Since the news of the lawsuit many members have voiced their opinions and therefore we have decided not pursue this matter further and have withdrawn the complaint.  We understand your concern and appreciate your interest in this matter.  We feel this decision is in the best interest of SNORE and its future.  SNORE will continue to move forward and provide great races that you all have come to enjoy.  

We appreciate your support and look forward to seeing you all at Ridgecrest this weekend,  if not we hope to see you at Rage at the River.

 

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By Mike Henle

 

The first winner of the SNORE 250 may not be driving an off-road racing car anymore, but he is as entrenched in the sport as ever. With the 42nd annual event scheduled Oct. 21-22 in Ridgecrest, Calif., the memories of the old days still linger.

Fritz Kroyer won the 1970 SNORE 250 in southwest Las Vegas to kick off a storied career that also included winning back-to-back Mint 400 in the next two years at the Mint Gun Club in the northwest portion of Las Vegas Valley.

Now 68, the Danish-born Kroyer is a prototype fabricator for Kroyer Racing Engines on the grounds of Las Vegas Motor Speedway. He stepped away from the sport of off-road racing in 1985 after competing in an event in Mohave, Calif.

“His talent is absolutely unbelievable,” said son Kevin, a partner with hotel-casino owner and former off-road competitor Michael Gaughan in Kroyer Racing Engines. “His original nickname from our Walker Evans days was ‘the original Bad Ass” because there is nothing he cannot do.

“He is at the gym every morning while I’m still sleeping.”

The elder Kroyer is at the gym every day by 4 in the morning. He can’t imagine starting his day any other way.

“I didn’t work out like this when I was racing,” he said. “I just feel better going to the gym and I can tell the difference when I don’t start my day out by going to the gym.”

The win in the first SNORE 250 was a story in itself for Kroyer, who rolled his unlimited single-seat custom made Funco on the first lap.

“We were running somewhere near what is now Spanish Trail,” Kroyer recalled with a  huge smile. “It was a drag race start with two cars starting side-by-side. I had to make a hard right hand turn coming out of the gravel pit and landed on my wheels.

“I was so embarrassed because I rolled right in front of a bunch of fans. When I got to the pit, we replaced a couple of wheels. The only way I could redeem myself was by winning the race.”

Times have certainly changed as it relates to off-road racing.

“You could run anywhere in the desert in those days,” Kroyer recalled. “It’s not even wide-open racing in Mexico anymore.”

However, even during a struggling economy not to mention other issues that the sport now endures, competitors are keeping Kroyer Racing busy.

“Many people in off-road racing have successful businesses,” Fritz said. “In some cases, when business slows down, they simply look at the slowdown as a time to do more racing.”

The off-road business remains good to the Kroyer family especially considering its recent success with drivers like Trophy Truck drivers Rob MacCachren, BJ Baldwin and Bryce Menzies; all of whom have taken major victories.

Among Kroyer’s customers is SNORE Class 1 charger and Southern California resident Kyle Conlon, who is currently the Class 1 leader and second overall in the points behind Class 1-2 1600 veteran Kenny Freeman.

“The sport is very time-consuming and very expensive,” Kroyer said. “You don’t race out of your back yard anymore. There is a lot of dedication that goes into the sport now. Just going to the race is tough considering how much equipment you need to take with you. Then, you have a truck and tools and people to help. There are huge expenses anymore."

“When I worked for Roger Mears, we figured out one time that it cost $50,000 to go to Mexico—and that was 10 years ago. I think we’re going see more and more closed-course racing in the sport. It’s getting so tough now especially when you consider the insurance and the fees involved with the sport.”

Kroyer has great memories of SNORE even after all the years.

“SNORE has done a very good job,” he said. “They have been around for decades and that shows a definite will of the people who are involved. Just look at the Freeman family which sill has several family members who are active in the sport.”

“SNORE has provided a great outlet for so many people.”

KJ Howe, the former race director of the Mint 400, has vivid memories about Kroyer.

“I raced in the Mint in 1971 and 1972 and Fritz went by me so fast that I suddenly realized that I had better learn a little more about off-road racing because it sure was different from the sports car racing that I was used to,” said Howe, now 72. “Fritz had an unbelievable ability to read the terrain and find the proper line through the rough areas so that he could go faster than anyone else.

“Plus, he was able to keep a car together until the end. He knew how to finish and that is the name of the game in off-road racing. He once told me that you have to first finish before you can finish first” which was a term later uttered to me by Parnelli Jones.”

Howe said he became close friends with Kroyer, who prepared the Mint-sponsored unlimited two-seater from about 1975-1982.

“Fritz had a company named Race Prep in the San Fernando Valley,” said Howe. “He knew suspensions, transmissions, shock setup and he had an outstanding reputation for preparing an off-road racing car. He prepared cars for a lot of off-road racers and was really respected for his ability to build and maintain race cars.”

Howe said Kroyer once did the stunt driving for a movie and jumped over the Berlin Wall.

“He had to go to Germany and they made him jump over a wall that was supposed to be the Berlin Wall,” said Howe. “He did stunt driving as well as racing while also prepping cars. He raced stadium races and the long-distance races like Baja so that just goes to show how versatile he was.”

SNORE’s top entrants headed into the SNORE 250 include Kenny Freeman, 2,921; Kyle Conlon, 2,906;  Blaine Conrad, 2,897; Kevin Ellis, 2,713; Cody Freeman, 2,651; Terry Householder, 2,622; Mike Boone, 2,616; Daniel Maurer, 2,612; and Cody Reid, 2,593. The club’s final race will be the Rage at the River in Laughlin, Dec. 10-11.

 

CAPTION:

Fritz Kroyer, right, won the first SNORE 250 in 1970. He is shown with his son, Kevin, at the Kroyer Racing Engines at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

Contact: Mike Henle, 702-279-3483

 

butchsspeedshopButch's Speed Shop in Las Vegas has put up bonus of $3,000 for 1ST overall at the SNORE 250 next month along with a $1,000 bonus to 1st in the 1600 class. Butch's speed shop carry's thousands of off road parts and is at the races to help support the race teams for those last minute needs.

 

racefuelenergyAlso RACE FUEL Energy Drink is putting up a $1000 bonus for 1st in class 12 and a $500 bonus for 1st in class 9 with no entry limits.


WIKSRacing-1Adam Wik owner of Wiks Racing Engines and long time desert racer has announced that his company will offer $500.00 to the first place finisher in class 10 using a Wiks tagged Eco-tec engine. This program will be in effect starting with the SNORE 250 and will continue throughout the 2012 season.

 

Updated Points after the KC Hilites Midnight Special. See the Victory Lane Menu.

 

SNORE, Primm execs team up to make the KC HiLiTES Midnight Special off-road race a reality

 

By Mike Henle

 

PRIMM, Nev. -- The 2011 SNORE KC HiLiTES Midnight Special presented here July 29-30 is now history, but it goes without saying that the end result is undoubtedly what could be termed one of the true miracles in the history of motorsports.

 

Thanks to last-minute team work on behalf of the 42 year-old Southern Nevada Off-Road Enthusiasts and a hearty group of hotel-casino executives, the event brought attention to this city 30 miles south of Las Vegas while also attracting a field of about 100 race vehicles and their crews.

 

A very unique event that usually begins at dusk before running well past midnight to escape the heat of the desert, the race included two nights of competition over an 8.6 mile layout that started and finished behind Buffalo Bill’s hotel casino just east of I-15.  Read More >

 

SNORE, Primm execs team up to make the KC HiLiTES Midnight Special off-road race a reality

 

By Mike Henle

 

PRIMM, Nev. -- The 2011 SNORE KC HiLiTES Midnight Special presented here July 29-30 is now history, but it goes without saying that the end result is undoubtedly what could be termed one of the true miracles in the history of motorsports.

 

Thanks to last-minute team work on behalf of the 42 year-old Southern Nevada Off-Road Enthusiasts and a hearty group of hotel-casino executives, the event brought attention to this city 30 miles south of Las Vegas while also attracting a field of about 100 race vehicles and their crews.

 

A very unique event that usually begins at dusk before running well past midnight to escape the heat of the desert, the race included two nights of competition over an 8.6 mile layout that started and finished behind Buffalo Bill’s hotel casino just east of I-15.

 

With SNORE discovering only a few weeks ago that their original venue of the Moapa Indian Reservation north of Las Vegas wasn’t possible, a call to Primm saved the event while also bringing business to the city formerly known as Stateline. This was a timely boost as SCORE had cancelled their August Primm event and headed south.

 

While there were certainly both winners and losers in the race, the key component was the fact that the race was a plus for Primm following the late exit by SCORE promoter Sal Fish who pulled the plug on the Terrible’s Primm 300 only weeks earlier before moving his race to Baja, Mexico.

 

Kyle Conlon, a 22 year-old electrician from San Diego, captured the overall win in a Jimco 1 with two-day, eight-lap total time of 2 hours. 21.05 minutes. His consistent times were highlighted by a best of 11:29.547 minutes on the third lap Saturday night.

 

“In my first heat, I broke the sway bar and ran the entire race without it,” said Conlon, who is running in his second year of competition. “Then, in the second heat, the alternator went out, but we had enough juice to make it to the finish.

 

“I would have to say that the high point of the race for me was just getting to the finish line. I hadn’t been able to get a first out of the car prior to this race. I’m really happy to both finish and get a win at the same time.”

 

Todd Wyllie, a 45 year-old real estate executive from New River, Ariz., north of Phoenix, took the Unlimited Truck win over prominent Las Vegas automobile dealer Steve Olliges of Team Ford.

 

“We wanted to run the overall strong” said Wyllie, who has been racing since 2003. “We had electrical issues on the final lap the first night. The course was toughest in the silt bed after you left the infield.”

 

In a statement echoed by just about everyone, Wyllie added “Considering the time that SNORE had to work with this, it was a mad scramble. All things considered, they did a great job. Them putting on this race any place was a Mission Accomplished, for sure.”

 

Olliges, a 48 year-old veteran who has been off-road racing since he was 18, said the race was a good shakedown event for the Best in the Desert Vegas-to-Reno event scheduled Aug. 18-21.

 

“It was great seeing everyone out there,” said Olliges, whose family has been in the car business for decades. “Then, too, it’s good getting the extra seat time.”

 

Justin Davis of Chino Hills, Calif., captured Class 10 although he, too, had his own challenges.

 

“We had a good weekend although our wiring railed on us Saturday,” said Davis, who is in the landscaping business. “Overall, I think the race went very well. I like the Grand Prix style where you just get out there and run as fast as you can. I think SNORE did an awesome job.”

 

Kenny Freeman, a member of SNORE’s board of directors and also the winner of Class 1600, predicted that the KC HiLiTES Midnight Special was the first of many off- road races in Primm.

 

“There were things that we could have done differently, but overall it was a good event,” said Freeman. “We received incredible help from the good people of Primm Valley Resorts and had it not been for them, there probably would not have been a Midnight Special this year.

 

“I think there will be even bigger off-road racing events in Primm in the future.”

 

Danny Fraire, a spokesman for the Location’s Racing Class 8 truck No. 8006, said “We didn’t have our lights aimed for the really tight sections on Friday. We adjusted for Saturday night and our driver Rick Harrah went for it and captured our first win.”

 

John Whitlow, the car chief for the NAPA Chassis No. 7155 truck driven by Peter Garfinkle, said “It must have taken a ton of coordination with the Primm property people to make the race happen.”

 

SNORE Race Director Robert Gross said racer support was strong for the race.

 

“We appreciate all the racers that supported our Midnight Special, especially after the venue chaos leading up to this event,” Gross said. "The majority of comments has been very positive and indicates the racers awareness of the many challenges we faced in putting this event together in less than three weeks.

 

“I hope to see all of you at our SNORE 250 in Ridgecrest CA in October.”

 

Race Registration Director Brittany Burgos added “The staff at Primm Valley Resorts was certainly gracious and extremely helpful in meeting our needs in the short timeframe we were forced to adhere to.

 

“Primm is always a great destination for a SNORE event and the racers love it.”

 

SNORE Director of Marketing Lawton Shank said the new format utilized added to the event.

 

“This year’s KC HiLiTES Midnight Special was interesting in that it consisted of two nights of heat racing rather than one long night event,” Shank explained. “This gave the drivers and spectators an opportunity for two nights of action for racers running with lights.

 

“The famous ‘Dike Jump’ became even more of a challenge for competitors at night, and was a great viewing area for spectators both nights.”

 

The praise of the race was also echoed by the staff of Primm Valley Resorts.

 

“We were thrilled with the Midnight Special results at Primm Valley this year,” said Stuart Richey, assistant general manager of Primm Valley Resorts and Casinos. “Congratulations to SNORE for an excellent event and to the hard-working teams that surpassed the rain and early hours for a tremendous victory. We look forward to another competitive run in the near future.”

 

Other winners include Justin Davis, Class 10; Cody Freeman in Class 12; Chris Wright in Class 13; Ryan Desautels, Class 1450; Tony Scott, Class 15; Daniel Maurer, 18; Kyle Ahrensberg, 3000; Steve Alexander, 5; Cody Agee, 5/1600; Dana Dague, 7; Rick Harrah, 8; Giti Gowland, 9; Robbie Cockreel, 7S Challenge; Joshua Starr, NAPA Chassis 7S Challenge; Dave Cote, Stock Bug; Adrian Diaz, StockFull; Steve Hengeveld, Trophy Lite; and Arturo Benavides, VORE-VC.

 

SNORE’s next race is 42nd annual SNORE 250 Oct. 21-23 in Ridgecrest, Calif.

 

CONTACT: Lawton Shank, SNORE, 702-351-6666; Val Moon, Primm Valley Resorts, 702-679-5467; Mike Henley, The Idea Company Public Relations, 702-279-3483.

 

ABOUT PRIMM VALLEY RESORTS: Situated about 30 miles south of Las Vegas, Primm, Nev. is the home of Primm Valley Resorts and Casinos and is situated on the Nevada-California state line. It consists of three hotel casinos, a large outlet mall; and a multitude of recreational activities including two championship Tom Fazio designed golf courses. Hotels include Whiskey Pete’s Hotel and Casino; Buffalo Bill’s Resort which features a 6,000 arena for concerts and events; and Primm Valley Resort and Casino; with 21,000 square feet of outstanding convention space; http:www.primmvalleyresorts.com/index.php.

 

Primm Valley Resorts is operated by Affinity Gaming LLC.

 

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CAPTION:

The annual KC HiLites Midnight Special run July 29-30 in Primm has been deemed a big success. The event run 30 miles south of Las Vegas consisted of two nights of competition over an 8.6 mile course. (Photos courtesy of Troy Van Mourwerik/Dusty Lenz Photography).

 

 


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